Exterior view of the Atwood House in Summer

Pilgrims’ Progress: Music of the Plimoth Colony Settlers

 

November 10, 5:00 – 6:00 pm

On the eve of the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower reaching Cape Cod, explore the music its passengers might have known! Dan Meyers and Karen Burciaga of early music ensemble Seven TImes Salt will give an online lecture-demo following the passengers from their homes in turbulent 1590s England, to religious refuge in the Netherlands, and onward to the unfamiliar shores of New England in 1620. The Plimoth colonists, or “Pilgrims” as they were later called, were a diverse group of Separatists and Anglicans, religious zealots and irreverent opportunists from many walks of life, and they brought with them experiences of music as varied as their reasons for coming to the New World. We’ll discuss and listen to music of the Elizabethan tavern and theater, songs by Thomas Ravenscroft, Dutch tunes, the Ainsworth Psalter, dances from Playford’s English Dancing Master, and more. You’ll hear music samples from the group’s CD “Pilgrims’ Progress,” recorded in the 1717 Meetinghouse in West Barnstable.

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You should receive a confirmation of your registration sent to your email which has information about viewing the lecture. If you do not receive this confirmation, please contact us by emailing us at atwoodreservations@gmail.com or calling us during normal business hours at (508) 945 – 2493.

 

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Location & Hours

Location

Atwood Museum
347 Stage Harbor Road
Chatham, MA 02633
508-945-2493

Dan Meyers and Karen Burciaga photographed by Matthew Stein and Devon Fernandez

Seven Times Salt

Since meeting as conservatory students in 2003, for the past 17 years Seven Times Salt has been delighted to bring the music of the 16th and 17th centuries to our audiences. Praised for creative programming and an “impeccably balanced sound”, Seven Times Salt has performed at venues throughout New England including Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Plimoth Plantation, Boston Public Library, New England Folk Festival, WGBH radio, and many others. They have researched and presented original programs for music festivals, college residencies, theatrical productions, historical societies, and their own self-produced concert series. Its musicians delight in blurring the lines between “art music” and folk tunes, and feel at ease performing in the concert hall, the dance hall, or the beer hall!